Sea captain Edward McCoskrie was born in Gloucester, England in 1853 and first came to Galiano in 1890. He was one of the first pioneer settlers to clear some land by hand and build himself a farm. He settled in 1894 on the land now known as Cable Bay Farm and began construction of the hand hewn log house called today our "Captain's Quarters". Although he went to sea for a living, he brought his family of three children (Bill 17, Annie 12 and Frances 7) and the blind 81 year old Mother of his first wife who had died i n 1892. When McCoskrie took over the land, there stood only a very rudimentary lean-to abode with an earthen floor up by an orchard. In the winter of 1894, this dwelling had to serve the family, even though sacks of flour were used as extra seats!

McCoskrie set to work immediately on the new house with his son Bill, felling the fir trees and squaring off only the centres of each log using an adze. The work of dove-tailing the timbers and erecting the roof was completed early in 1895 and once the family moved in, McCoskrie returned to navigating vessels on the B.C. Coast. He hired a live-in teacher-cum-governess on Galiano, Ethel Johnson, who instructed the children beneath a lean-to classroom built at the back of the log house (a replica of this structure is seen today). The time for books was definite and serious for their father was a Master Mariner and their grandfather had been an architect and builder in England. This "classroom" had no door, only a curtain on a rod over the doorway.

Soon Captain McCoskrie married again and his new wife Emma Gibberson gave birth to three more children (Phyllis, Emma & Harry). At the turn of the century, Edward McCroskrie moved north, first to Hattly Bay and then further north to Prince Rupert in Northern British Columbia where he became Harbour Master until his death in 1925. His first son, Bill, inherited the land and remained to farm there for his lifetime living in the Captain's Quarters. As was usual in those days, the family members took delight in making their own simple pleasures, while gradually they learned the skills of pioneer Galiano farm life; to fell a tree, dig a well; ride a horse, harness the horses and plough the field. They also had to milk the cow, churn the cream, make the butter, bake the bread, tend to the animals, make the jams and jellies and even brew a dandelion wine! Source of Information: Agnes Lambe, 1983 "The Naming of Roads." B.C. Gulfways, Sept 2, p 2

In the 1980's sea captain Thomas Schnare and his wife Helen purchased the property, now known as Cable Bay Farm. Thomas's passion has been to restore this beautiful old log farmhouse to its original condition. The building had been abandoned for several decades and much of the interior had rotted away. Despite these obstacles, Thomas was determined "to renew and revive the log house and create a picture of what life might have been like on Galiano 100 years ago". In July 1995, 100 years after McCroskrie completed his house, the restoration began.

When they began the project, the Schnares wanted "to keep as much of the original structure as possible and replace only those logs disintegrated beyond repair." The result of their renovation is an exact size replica with one log added to the height of the house to provide more headroom on the upper deck. Thomas has also installed beautiful new teak and fir floors and an authentic ship's ladder between the decks! The labour of love has been time consuming. Thomas estimates he has put in 1,200 to 1,500 hours on the McCroskrie house since renovation began. Now guests may experience pioneer Galiano architecture, fine wood craftsmanship and also enjoy all the conveniences of a fully equipped and very special Log Home.

The picture to the left is a reproduction of a drypoint print. This intaglio print was created by Ronaldo Norden in March of 1976. It is called McCoskrie Ranch and is the fifth print of thirty and was published in The Active Page, Galiano's monthly journal in September of 1997. When they began the project, the Schnares wanted "to keep as much of the original structure as possible and replace only those logs disintegrated beyond repair." The result of their renovation is an exact size replica with one log added to the height of the house to provide more headroom on the upper deck. Thomas has also installed beautiful new teak and fir floors and an authentic ship's ladder between the decks!